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Monday Workplace News Round-up

Good morning. Here are some headlines catching my eye today:

Should employees be able to file class action discrimination lawsuits? The U.S. Supreme Court will decide.

2010 will go down as one of the worst years in U.S. history for bank failures.

Greece is setting up an electronic system to monitor compensation of government employees.

Bedbugs have dreams of making it big in Hollywood.

U.S. News And World Report
says public relations will be one of the best career choices over the next decade. Yeah, because journalists don't have jobs anymore.

Employers in the United Kingdom say they can't find any skilled employees, either.

Online retailer Zappos will hire 1,000 seasonal workers today.

The expensive college degree you earned back in the 1980s doesn't mean squat in this job market.

SeaWorld and Busch Gardens give 350 employees tickets to ride the happy fun time unemployment roller coaster.

A retired colonel goes to battle with the Library of Congress for firing him.

Given a choice, women want an iPhone and men want an Android.

Employees in Alaska get ready to pay more into the state's Unemployment Insurance fund.

Canada's economy is sucking wind, too.

The Texas Supreme Court says state employees' birth dates aren't for public consumption.

Kohler's unionized employees plan an informational picket as labor talks continue.

Prfessor.com has announced a business training program. Prfessor.com?

Is your boss a bully or just a tough cookie? It depends on whom you ask, I guess.

Baby Boomers better put their Walmart greeter vests on standby now that 80 is the new 65.

Lawyers in Las Vegas roll the dice on finding a job.

It's starting to look a lot like a Goodwill Christmas.

Businesswire.com runs an Onlinebootycall.com press release that lists the top ten dream celebrity booty calls.

A Techtree study finds teenagers are totally dependent on mobile phones.

Someone's snooping through federal workers' health records. Oh, and they can't look at WikiLeaks, either.

Software engineers tend to have terrible insomnia.

A study finds Gen Xers have an I'll do it myself attitude at work. That's because we don't think Gen Y has an attention span and Boomers have too many meetings.

The unemployment rate in Australia is now 5.2%, thanks to strong jobs growth.

Meanwhile, 60 Minutes ran a rare interview last night with U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, who says "it may take some years" before the U.S. unemployment rate falls to "more normal levels." At this rate, an enterprising chef will need to come up with some new recipes for spicing up a boring Top Ramen or Kraft mac and cheese dinner. Rachel Ray, your country needs you!

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