Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from June, 2015

Fired Millennials Most Likely To Vent Over Social Media

You just lost your job (so sorry...), and you really, really need to vent. Who do you turn to? If you're a Millennial, then you're most likely to turn to social media! Social recruiting and outplacement service CareerArc recently queried more than 1,300 job seekers, 218 HR and headhunters to find out how they work though a job loss. Not surprisingly, we're choosing to ride out the job-loss emotional roller coaster online: CareerArc found that nearly four in 10 surveyed (38%) have written a negative comment online about being fired. But the most interesting statistic, at least to me? The kayak-paddling Millennials are the most likely not only to poo-poo their former employer's brand forevermore, they're also the most likely to go on social media to get it all out one, vague status update at a time! Nearly three-fourths (73%) of Millennials in CareerArc's survey said that they've used social media as a shoulder to cry on after being either terminated …

How To Deal With Overly-Punctual Work Colleagues

Look at you, arriving for your next meeting with 10 minutes to spare! Aren't you the punctual one today. Wait, who's that? Oh, it's the business colleague who always arrives super-early to everything. Yes, it's time to discuss the overly-punctual co-worker! This blog has already covered the co-worker who always shows up late, as well as the co-worker who always leaves early. In fact, we've discussed a lot of time-related workplace behavior on this blog, but we've never discussed the co-worker who always -- always! -- shows up way too early. I'm not talking about the business colleague who arrives with five or 10 minutes to spare. That's pretty much common practice for the commonly-punctual professional. No, I'm talking about the working professional who is chronically 15/20/30/45 minutes early -- whether it's to a meeting, a working lunch, the boss's dinner party, the break-out session, the one-on-one discussion, or a co-worker's …

Here Are The Best States For Working Dads

We always hear about the best states for working mothers, but what about the best states for working fathers? Anyone, anyone? Luckily, personal finance website WalletHub has released a new survey that ranks the best places for working dads! With Father's Day fast approaching, WalletHub apparently thought: "Hey, why not analyze the work-life balance, health conditions, financial well-being and child-rearing environments for working dads in the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia across 20 key metrics?" I mean, what better gift could the average working dad receive than the knowledge that he could significantly lower his overall work-life stress simply by relocating thousands of miles in either direction with small children in tow? It's either this survey, or receiving a new pair of beige socks over the weekend. (In our defense, dads can be hard to buy for!) So which U.S. state is decidedly best for working dads? In a word: Minnesota. Known for its cold wi…

Survey Reveals Social Media's Biggest Workplace Problem

You keep urging a fellow business professional to get with the times and join social media, but he or she won't do it. Why is that? Don't worry, a new survey reveals the reasons why many working professionals still cling to their offline status! Scredible, an Irish-based developer of "socially-driven education technologies," recently surveyed 1,000 U.S. and British working professionals in the 25-to-45 demographic about their thoughts on social media. Specifically, why they don't bother using it. In 2015. It turns out there are many reasons working professionals still avoid social media, and first among them is the preponderance of "useless content." In fact, only 3% surveyed think social media content is useful in any way. Meanwhile, slightly more than one-quarter of U.S. workers surveyed (26%) say they don't have the time to post to social media at work -- because they're busy working, ahem -- while almost one-quarter (24%) think socia…

Showing Off Without Showing Up: The Aspirational R.S.V.P.

Do you use social media to invite other working professionals to your business events? Do many of them say they'll be there, but they never show up? Congratulations, you've just been had by something called "The Aspirational R.S.V.P"! As the old saying goes, nobody on the Internet knows you're a dog. Likewise, nobody on the Internet who reads the enthusiastic responses to your Facebook event invite knows that most of them won't actually show up. A writer for The New York Times refers to this "trend" as "The Aspirational R.S.V.P." Meaning, we indicate publicly on social media that we're "so there" but when the time comes we're nowhere to be found. At least, not anywhere in the vicinity of where the event is taking place. It's the intersection between our very public intentions (sign me up!) and our very private desires (count me out!) in the social media age. It's showing off without showing up. The Aspirati…

Twitter To Lose the 140-character Limit On Direct Messages

Twitter announced that it will lose the 140-character limit on direct messages starting next month. Now everyone will be able to message each other directly, and at Tolstoy length, to say "thanks" for the follow! Our public tweets will still be limited to 140 characters, at least for now. If people can embarrass themselves at short length, just imagine what they'll be able to do one day if Twitter ever removes the 140-character limit on public tweets. (Don't worry, working journalists: You would still be able to source an entire story using only Twitter for "quotes," you would just have to sift through a lot more text to find these quotes.) So what does this change mean for the workplace? Well, Twitter also announced that, starting next month, we will be able to have direct, texting-like messaging conversations with up to 20 other people using photos AND emojis! Think virtual staff meetings, only with cat head icons. Will companies, however, want to …

Presenteeism Vs. Absenteeism: Which One Is Worse?

Here's a question for you: Is it better to go to work but not be productive, or just call in sick? This question was put to employees, employers and physicians across Canada recently, and it turns out management and staff have very different opinions on the topic. I'll let an Exchange magazine article break it down:The survey also showed that employees are more likely to see presenteeism as a serious issue than employers. The majority of employees (53 per cent) indicated that presenteeism is a serious issue in their workplace, versus 32 per cent of employers. Employees are also more likely to see presenteeism as a more serious issue in their workplace than absenteeism, while employers are more likely to see the reverse. According to the report, more than half of employers (52 per cent) see absenteeism as a serious issue in their workplace compared to 43 per cent of employees. "Presenteeism," if you're not familiar with the term, means coming to work but not bei…

For the Office Extrovert, It Isn't Easy Being Green

Introverts take heat from extroverts for needing downtime after "only" two hours of polite small talk, but extroverts are so busy talking about their awesome weekend that they could be contributing to global warming! A new University of Portsmouth Business School (U.K.) study of "green" attitudes unearths a rather startling discovery: The extroverts among us are the "least likely" to practice "green" habits. These "green" habits include (and are probably not limited to) turning off the lights when they leave a room; shutting off running water; buying recycled stuff; remembering to use recyclable bags at the supermarket; and turning off the television when nobody is watching it. Why? Because they're too busy talking, of course! For extroverts, it isn't easy being green. Ah, ah, ah -- talk to the hand, extroverts. You'll get your turn to talk in a minute. First, let's hear from researcher Sianne Gordon-Wilson:"I…

OoomMG: Yoga Pants Stretching Into the Workplace

Do you own more than one pair of yoga pants? Do you wear them to the supermarket, to the big box store, and to lunch at many a fast-casual dining establishment? Sure you do, women of the workforce! Yoga pants are worldwide these days. Now these stretchy, "workout" pants are establishing themselves in the workplace. Specifically among the creative class, which is busy mixing and matching upscale (read: costs more than the average electric bill) yoga pants with scarves, pumps and Prada. As Fortune magazine deeply exhales and reports:"I believe Lululemon was the gateway drug for women wearing yoga pants in public," says Rebecca McKinney Blair, founder of Whistle Club boutique in Santa Barbara, which will carry a $400 luxury sweat pant this fall. "Comfort is key today. And when we’re simultaneously celebrating comfort in fashion (like a time when Birkenstocks are in style and not relegated to hippies) it becomes more acceptable to invest in such pieces."G…

That's Nuts: Dealing With Food Allergies At Work

The peanut-free classroom. Anyone with children is familiar with the concept of not providing classroom snacks that might contain peanuts, or other ingredients, to which a classmate is allergic. All too soon (sniff!), these children will be entering the workplace. Now the question is, employers: Do you have your peanut-free lunch table ready to go? Food allergies are serious business for anyone who has one. Employees with food allergies know instinctively which break room snacks, potluck dishes, and catered lunch items to avoid -- which, most likely, will be all of them. They've learned from a young age to bring their own food from home to avoid any allergy-induced health issues, such as not being able to breathe. Food allergies can be life-threatening. As today's children move from school to the workplace, they will surely start asking management a few questions:Hey, where's the peanut-free lunch table? I always had one at school. Can we stop having catered lunches …

Beep! Big Companies Are Getting Rid of Voice Mail

Disney may be firing U.S. employees after making them train their foreign replacements, but other U.S. companies are quietly ditching something else: voice mail. Yes, U.S. employees who haven't yet been replaced on our own soil by someone from another country may soon find themselves leaving fewer voice mail messages after the beep! With email, texting, instant messaging, Facebook, Twitter and workplace apps such as Slack, companies are coming to see voice mail as an archaic, wasteful line item that should be eliminated from the spreadsheet, sort of like the average, decently-paid U.S. employee. As a Wall Street Journal article explains:Under pressure to cut costs and eliminate waste, large lenders including J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., Citigroup Inc. and Bank of America Corp., are either eliminating or considering paring back a service once seen as essential to bank workers as calculators and business cards, said people familiar with the banks. Bank executives said that, in …

Should Companies Be Giving Fitbits To Employees?

Ah, wellness. Employers want it, and overworked employees will think about it and get back to you. Who can blame them? Work is exhausting these days! If a new study is any indication, then our sedentary nature is getting the best of us at work. Standing up, and moving around, is good for us. Over the years, companies have added wellness programs to encourage more healthful, less-sedentary lifestyle habits. Getting employees to participate in wellness programs has been somewhat of a challenge, however, because many employees do not want employers having access to their health information. Now the EEOC is proposing updated wellness guidelines for employers. At the same time, private enterprise is busy encouraging us to buy "wearable fitness trackers" -- a.k.a., those Fitbit watch thingies that tell us exactly how little physical activity we've had so far today. Microsoft has its own wearable fitness tracker, and, of course, there's the new Apple Watch. The average …