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Showing posts from November, 2015

Five Tips For Taking Kids To the Company Party

You have received an invitation to the company party that says young kids are welcome. So...are you going to bring your kids, or not? I've been there, shadowing a trouble-seeking toddler who was aggressively roaming the very well-manicured, multi-level home of The Boss, who just so happened to collect colorful, and incredibly breakable, vases! Of course, grabbing the glassware and dropping it on the floor was the ultimate goal of our toddler, who, for some reason, did not have bookcases filled to the gills with gorgeous, prism-shimmering glassware at home. The boss was incredibly gracious and welcoming, but playing successful shelf defense*** was utterly exhausting. As fun as the party was, I felt like a shell of a human being on the drive home as our toddler snored in the car seat. I suppose my story isn't a ringing endorsement of hitting the company party circuit with children in tow, but I learned a few things from the experience! Bringing young kids to the company holi…

How To Turn Workplace Gift Giving Into A Gift For Yourself

It's not even mid-November, but this year is moving quickly toward its logical conclusion: December. This means it's time to add new entries to my annual Oh No, It's the Holidays Again! blog series. So far, we've uncovered the unfortunate truth about Secret Santas, sent the potluckphobe to the company holiday potluck, dressed down co-workers who brag about their expensive holiday gifts, discussed how to talk to a co-worker's spouse at the company holiday party, and figured out what happens when a company's holiday gifts don't stay current with the times. I was planning to blog about the 2015 holiday season "soon," just like I'm procrastinating with my holiday gift shopping. Then I came across an Ad Age article about McCann's new holiday ad campaign for Office Depot, and I suddenly felt inspired to blog about the holidays. This year, Office Depot is touting its 2015 holiday Co-worker Collection. As the article points outs, it's a d…

Workplace Distractions Creep Into the C-suite

Do you feel like workplace distractions have taken a toll on your ability to concentrate? Take heart, everyone: Senior managers are feeling attention span pain, too! Workplace distractions abound in the 21st Century, and with today's open office environments they're only getting worse. From peripheral movement to co-worker chatter to the rank smell of our co-worker's day-old fish platter, we might feel like there are barriers beyond our control when it comes to concentrating at work. But what about distractions at the senior management level, where the job might include nifty features such as closed doors and executive assistants? Yeah, how distracted is the C-suite these days? In what may be a small glimpse into the modern life of senior management, software and services provider Abila looked into the challenges facing non-profit CFOs and found that almost half (49%) view "daily interruptions" as their most pressing workplace challenge! In fact, dealing wi…

The Millennials Are the Most Jealous Generation

A new study reveals which generation is the most likely to have the green-eyed monster quietly lurking within, and I'll warn you now that it isn't pretty.We've already discussed our jealous co-workers, but what drives their envy and how old are they? Researchers at UC San Diego looked into it, and discovered that younger people tend to be the most envious, and over a longer list of things! Here's the main gist of our jealous ways, according to the press release:Envy was a common experience. More than three fourths of all study participants reported experiencing envy in the last year, with slightly more women (79.4 percent) than men (74.1 percent). The experience declined with age: About 80 percent of people younger than 30 reported feeling envious in the last year. By ages 50 and over, that figure went down to 69 percent. Are these findings surprising? In some ways, no. It makes sense that we let more things go than our waistlines as we age. When we're young, w…

Disclosing A Disability In Cover Letters Is Risky Business

Imagine you've been handed two cover letters that look virtually identical in terms of qualifications and experience, except for one thing: One of the job applicants admits to a disability on paper. Which one would you interview? Well, a new Rutgers/Syracuse study reveals that disabled-but-highly-qualified job applicants are 34% less likely to hear from employers than nondisabled job applicants with the same qualifications. The researchers sent out more than 6,000 fictitious resumes and cover letters in response to advertised accounting jobs. I'll let the official Rutgers rundown offer an overview of the study methodology:The research team carefully crafted robust resumes and matched the experience to job openings on a major job-search website. No employer was applied to twice. There were two candidate profiles—one with six years' experience, the other about a year out of college. Candidates with and without disabilities were equally qualified. One-third of the cover le…